The Nature of Prophecy

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These are notes for an incomplete "Concept" page.

Information is being added as the Bible Pages are added. In the end, everything will be compiled, further information added (as necessary), broken links connected, etc.


Cross-references

Parent Topic
  • a
Related Topics
  • b
Links to Additional Materials
  • c

Parent category: Prophecy

Prophecy in Scripture is simply history described before it happens. It is not guesswork or the expression of carefully calculated probabilities. There is no "failure rate" for the prophecies of Scripture, for no prophecy of Scripture has ever (nor could ever, nor will ever) fail.


(Some random comments, to be organized later.)

  • Some prophecy is not for us today, but is for people in the future, either at the time of fulfillment, or after that time.
  • Multiple events may be combined into one account.
  • Information may be omitted about specific details.
  • It's easier to understand after it's fulfilled!
  • Prophecy is not always chronological. Sometimes it presents "snapshots" of various issues in a topical or logical arrangement (which, at times, may also be somewhat chronological).
  • Our views are distorted by our own circumstances, and we need our eyes opened, before we can understand prophecy with accuracy.
  • The purpose for prophecy is not for idle curiosity.
  • We must trust God and let him "worry" about the final results.
  • The past fulfillment of prophecy shows us how to expect the future fulfillment of prophecy. Two examples: 1) Jesus' first coming, and 2) various events that occurred before Jesus' coming (examples are found in the books of Isaiah and Daniel).



Scripture Pages that Link to Here

Isaiah 24:1-23

Prophecy is not always chronological in every detail. Sometimes it presents "snapshots" of various issues in a topical arrangement (which, at times, may also be somewhat chronological). Its message may also "transition" from one future event to another, without making a noticeable divide between the two events.


Isaiah 25:1-12

The events described in this chapter are still future; but they have already been "planned" (v. 1), and cannot fail to happen.


Isaiah 46:5-13

Isaiah 41:2, 25 illustrate the nature of prophecy. Historically, Cyrus came from the east (41:2 - Persia), but by way of the north (41:25 - Babylon). These two verses might have seemed contradictory, until it was fulfilled!


Unless otherwise noted, all notes and comments are © by Dennis Hinks.
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